News of Black Lives UU

Black Lives UU Organizing Collective was formed in 2015 in the wake of several conversations among Black UUs at the July 2015 Movement for Black Lives Convening in Cleveland, OH. Their website can be found at:

http://www.blacklivesuu.com/

This last week the UUA Board met and in a strong act of solidarity approved funding for Black Lives of UU. You can read the article here:

View story at Medium.com

The article says that: “This work, led by Black Unitarian Universalists, is stronger and more complete because of our partnership with the UUA, and the emotional and logistical support of non-Black people of color, as well as white UUs and others.” In August, Black Lives UU posted a statement about the recent killings in Dallas, Baton Rouge and Falcon Heights. That statement, which you can read here:

View story at Medium.com

includes ways to take action as a people of faith. May we as a people of faith do the work we are called to do to create a world where black lives truly matter.

News of Black Lives UU

Nurturing our spirits

In a world that demands more and more of our attention, how do we nurture our spirits?

In an article online in the UU world, Alicia Forde says and asks:

“Sometimes, it seems like there are so few places in which we can show up and be as fully present as possible, so few places in which our unguarded selves are heard into being. What spaces can you and will you create to allow for the distillation of your musings? To allow for your inner knowing to emerge, be seen, and be accepted? Where is your sanctuary in the midst of life’s catastrophes and chaos? How will you take the time to nurture your soul?”

The article can be found here: http://www.uuworld.org/articles/personal-discovery-within-community?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sep26

How do we care for our spirits? Does UUSIC provide a place where you can be as fully present as possible and be accepted, no, welcomed, for who you are as you are? How can our spiritual community provide ways to help you nurture your spirit?

Nurturing our spirits

We can no longer be silent

Here is a link to a very powerful article in which a white woman explains what white privilege is and how she will use her power and her privilege to dismantle white privilege:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amanda-redhead/i-am-a-white-mother-deman_b_10867410.html

A quote from the article:

What I am realizing today is that I can no longer be silent. The ideas that have kept me silent are ideas of separation and to eradicate the horrors of what are happening today, we must all stand together.

As Unitarian Universalists and all those aligned with our values, including the inherent worth and dignity of every person, how will we stand together?  How will we use our privilege and power to dismantle white privilege and bring an end to the deaths of black people in this country?

We can no longer be silent

When someone says “all lives matter” show them this!

Here is an article that demonstrates why saying “All lives matter” is an act of dismissing black lives.  So, as the article says, the next time someone says “all lives matter” in response to “black lives matter” show them these five paragraphs.

http://fusion.net/story/170591/the-next-time-someone-says-all-lives-matter-show-them-these-5-paragraphs/?utm_source=facebook

When someone says “all lives matter” show them this!

America’s Third Reconstruction

This second UUA Thirty Days of Love: Towards Racial Justice message talks about the profound and important work of the North Carolina NAACP and the book The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics and the Rise of the New Justice Movement by Rev. Dr. William J. Barber and Jonathan Wilson-Hargrove.  The article offers 14 concrete action steps to mobilize and do this work.

http://www.standingonthesideoflove.org/ourstories/fourteen-steps-forward-together-for-americas-third-reconstruction

The Beacon Press website says that:  “At a time when divide-and-conquer politics are exacerbating racial strife and economic inequality, Rev. Barber offers an impassioned, historically grounded argument that Moral Mondays are hard evidence of an embryonic Third Reconstruction in America.  The first Reconstruction briefly flourished after Emancipation, and the second Reconstruction ushered in meaningful progress in the civil rights era. But both were met by ferocious reactionary measures that severely curtailed, and in many cases rolled back, racial and economic progress. This Third Reconstruction is a profoundly moral awakening of justice-loving people united in a fusion coalition powerful enough to reclaim the possibility of democracy—even in the face of corporate-financed extremism.” 

http://www.beacon.org/The-Third-Reconstruction-P1139.aspx

It is time for the Third Reconstruction of America.  What will we as Unitarian Universalists do to help to bring it about?

 

America’s Third Reconstruction

Can we ever truly be the missional church I imagine?

In an article about Unitarian Universalism, Peter Boullata argues that we lack a theology that grounds us.  This lack of theology makes us nothing more than a “Rotary Club for religiously inclined political liberals”.  Have we dropped theology in favor of social action?  I disagree with him, believing instead that our theology is deeply grounded in the reality that we are all one (Unitarianism) and that we are all loved; no one is beyond Love itself (Universalism).

“Religious liberals, both within our movement and beyond it, dropped theology in favor of social action in the twentieth century. We are compelled to do social justice work, but we have little or no understanding of why this is religious. To base whole congregations around this kind of mission work without a clearly articulated theology is to reinvent the Rotary Club for religiously inclined political liberals. And a clearly articulated theology of social ministry is not possible as long as “theology” is whatever individuals happen to believe, think, or feel at any given moment.

Inasmuch as Unitarian Universalist communities continue to neglect discernment, theology, discipline, spiritual practice, faith formation, vocation and engagement with our historic testimonies and tradition, we will never be a missional religious movement. As long as we are known as the church of individual seekers we will never have the kind of impact that a missional religion has on transforming the world. It should go without saying that the chronically self-involved have no interest in serving the needs of others.”

Here’s a link to his article:

http://peterboullata.com/2011/12/29/the-liberal-church-finding-its-mission-its-not-about-you/

Why can’t we be a church of individual seekers who are brought together by the theological reality that we are all one and all are loved, no matter the lens through which we understand these two great truths?

 

Can we ever truly be the missional church I imagine?